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dc.contributor.supervisor Tromly, Luke (English, Film, and Theatre) en_US
dc.contributor.author Muir, Breanna
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-11T15:19:21Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-11T15:19:21Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09-11
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/24029
dc.description.abstract Faulkner’s literature, set in the American South, imagines a rich olfactory environment. The ways in which characters employ their sense of smell provide information regarding the gender and racial stereotypes portrayed and maintained within Faulkner’s fictional communities. In my texts of focus, these communities are often characterized by misogyny, conservatism, and Christian piety. Within these narrow minded communities, an exploration of Faulkner’s olfactory landscape is important in order to examine how olfactory stimuli are interpreted and applied to the marginalized female and racially coded body. In Faulkner’s literature, smells appear to trigger male anxieties concerning the female body, anxieties related to sexuality and racial misrecognition, and scent is largely correlated to the objectification of female characters in a manner comparable to the male gaze. en_US
dc.subject Faulkner en_US
dc.subject Olfaction en_US
dc.title Olfaction in William Faulkner's fiction: exploring gender and race through the sense of smell en_US
dc.degree.discipline English, Film, and Theatre en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Warne, Vanessa (English, Film, and Theatre)Thorpe, Jocelyn (Women's and Gender Studies) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2014 en_US


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