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dc.contributor.supervisor Freeze, Rick (Education) en_US
dc.contributor.author Reimer, Kenneth Lloyd
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-08T19:51:12Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-08T19:51:12Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09-08
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23997
dc.description.abstract It is a widespread belief in western society today that every adolescent is capable of attaining a high school diploma (Pharris-Ciureja, Hirschman, & Willhoft, 2012). In reality, a Statistics Canada (2012) “Labour Force Survey” concluded that only 73.9% of all 18 and 19 year olds have received high school diplomas. Richards (2009) stated that Manitoba’s high school dropout rate is the highest in Canada, and is twice as high as that of British Columbia. Unfortunately, many adolescents have started on the path to dropping out long before they enter high school (Downing & Peckham-Hardin, 2007) due to a combination of sociological, socioeconomic, cultural, developmental, behavioural, and academic factors (Englund, Edgeland, & Collins, 2008; Pharris-Ciureja, Hirschman, & Willhoft, 2012; Richards 2009). To better understand this phenomenon, I used the critical analytical tool of the immanent critique (Skrtic, 1995); and several different critical thinking tools (Levy, 2010). I also reviewed literature concerning sociology and education, Manitoba’s interpretation of inclusion, and the unique nature of high schools and their teachers. The purpose of this study was to invite Manitoba high school classroom teachers into a think tank and ask them what they believe they do to help adolescents stay in school and graduate. I found that the high school classroom teachers who participated in the study creatively strived to connect with students, worked individually and collaboratively with colleagues, and acknowledged the need for legislation, policies, and administration. They also took the time to examine current educational practices and continuously searched for innovative ways to improve their classrooms, schools, and the system-at-large. I concluded that school systems would greatly benefit from seeking out the voices of high school teachers and asking them what they think. en_US
dc.subject high school en_US
dc.subject teachers en_US
dc.subject graduation en_US
dc.subject dropout en_US
dc.subject inclusion en_US
dc.subject special education en_US
dc.subject think tank en_US
dc.title Potential solutions to Manitoba’s high school dropout crisis: insights of a high school classroom teacher think tank en_US
dc.degree.discipline Education en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Enns, Charlotte (Education) Kueneman, Rod (Sociology) Marlett, Nancy (University of Calgary) en_US
dc.degree.level Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2014 en_US


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