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dc.contributor.supervisor Strachan, Shaelyn (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) en_US
dc.contributor.author Meade, Laura
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-22T18:57:59Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-22T18:57:59Z
dc.date.issued 2014-08-22
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23859
dc.description.abstract According to Cybernetic Control theories, negative emotions result when goal progress is thwarted and these emotions facilitate behavioural regulation (Carver & Scheier, 1998). Self-conscious emotions are recognized for their self-regulatory functions with guilt and shame being especially central to governing unhealthy behavior change (Dijkstra & Buunk, 2008). However limited research has explored the role of self-conscious emotions and exercise. In light of the concern about low physical activity rates among Canadians (Canadian Community Health Measures Survey, 2011) examining the role of guilt and shame in the self-regulation of exercise is warranted. Purpose. To examine the nature of guilt and shame related to recent exercise behavior. Procedures. In this online, observational study, 128 women and 47 men aged 18-64 (mean age 36, SD = 12.74) completed measures of recent physical activity, trait shame and guilt, exercise identity and demographics at baseline. On both a day when they did and did not engage in intended exercise, participants completed measures of recent exercise quantity and quality, exercise-related state shame and guilt, attributions (on the missed exercise day) and exercise intentions. Results. T-tests revealed that participants experienced more guilt and shame after a missed as opposed to an engaged-in intended exercise session, and that of these two emotions guilt was felt more intensely. Regression analyses determined that perceptions of exercise quality were negatively related to both guilt and shame, however these emotions were not related to exercise intentions. Guilt was associated with the attribution dimension of internal locus of casualty and shame with stability, but no relationships were found between the two emotions and exercise identity. Lastly, logistic regressions showed that shame, but not guilt, was associated with exercise behaviour with shame showing a negative relationship with behaviour. Findings add to the extant literature on the role of shame and guilt in exercise self-regulation. en_US
dc.subject Guilt en_US
dc.subject Physical Activity en_US
dc.subject Shame en_US
dc.subject Self-Regulation en_US
dc.subject Self-conscious emotions en_US
dc.title Is there positive in the negative? Understanding the role of guilt and shame in physical activity self-regulation en_US
dc.degree.discipline Kinesiology and Recreation Management en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Moola, Fiona (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) Bailis, Daniel (Psychology) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2014 en_US


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