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dc.contributor.supervisor Woodbury, Allan (Civil Engineering) en_US
dc.contributor.author Assefa, Kibreab
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-27T15:24:27Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-27T15:24:27Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Assefa, K. A., and A. D. Woodbury [2013], Transient, Spatially varied Groundwater Recharge Modelling, Water Resources Research, 49, doi: 10. 1002/wrcr.20332 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/22212
dc.description.abstract The main goal of this research is to develop and test a groundwater recharge estimation method that can address some of the key research priorities in groundwater. In this context use is made of various modelling tools including ArcGIS, field data (in situ observations of soil temperature and soil moisture), and soil physics as represented by a physically based vadose zone hydrologic model (HYDRUS-1D). The research is conducted in a pilot watershed in north Okanagan, Canada. The public version of HYDUS-1D and another version with detailed freezing and thawing module are first used to investigate seasonal distribution of heat and water movement in the vadose zone. Model performance is evaluated in different scales by using field data, the gradient-based optimization algorithm of HYDRUS-1D, and ROSETTA derived prior information about soil hydraulic parameters. The latter are fitted to statistical distributions and used in Monte-Carlo experiments to assess the potential uncertainty in groundwater recharge due to model parameters. Next, the significance of the recharge estimation method for catchment scale transient groundwater modelling is demonstrated by applying uniform and variable flux boundary condition to a saturated zone transient groundwater model, MIKESHE. The results showed that the traditional uniform recharge assumption can lead to misleading decisions related to water resources management and pumping well network design. The effect of pumping well network and the provincial Water Act on water resources sustainability are further examined in an evolving climate. The results suggest potential water resource problem in the basin, which can possibly be attributed to the previously installed pumping well network (depth and screen level), and the provincial water use policy. The findings of this study demonstrate that such problems related to inappropriate well network and water resource management can greatly be minimised with the use of the recharge estimation method developed in this study. en_US
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons en_US
dc.subject Groundwater recharge en_US
dc.subject Water resources management and policy en_US
dc.subject Climate change en_US
dc.subject Surfacewater-groundwater interaction en_US
dc.title Groundwater recharge modelling: linkage to aquifers and implications for water resources management and policy en_US
dc.degree.discipline Civil Engineering en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Rasmussen, Peter (Civil Engineering) Hanesiak, John (Environment and Geography) Burn, Donald (Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo) en_US
dc.degree.level Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) en_US
dc.description.note February 2014 en_US


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