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dc.contributor.supervisor Entz, Martin (Plant Science) en_US
dc.contributor.author Podolsky, Kristen
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-11T13:31:10Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-11T13:31:10Z
dc.date.issued 2013-09-11
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/22160
dc.description.abstract Reducing tillage in Canadian organic cropping systems is a priority to preserve soil quality and increase long term sustainability. Novel methods for management of cover crops offer farmers the opportunity to reduce both tillage and herbicide use during this phase of the crop rotation but require further investigation across a range of cropping systems. The objective of this study was to compare the blade roller, flail mower and wide blade cultivator (noble blade) with standard tillage for management of an annual pea-barley (Pisum sativum L. – Hordeum vulgare L.) green manure in the Canadian prairies. The experiment was conducted twice at Carman, Manitoba (long-term organic management) and Lethbridge, Alberta (previous herbicide and fertilizer use) from 2010-2012. The green manure was planted in spring of year 1 and grown until pea full bloom when five management treatments were applied; 1) standard tillage with a field disc 2) blade roller, 3) blade rolled once plus tillage in late fall and spring, 4) wide blade cultivator and 5) flail mower. Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was planted in spring of year 2. The effect of management treatment on surface residue, soil nitrogen, soil microclimate, weed population dynamics and subsequent spring wheat yield was evaluated. At Carman, managing green manure without tillage (blade roller or flail mower) significantly increased winter annual and perennial weed pressure and reduced soil nitrate availability; these factors contributed to wheat yield reductions in both years compared to standard tillage. Wide blade cultivation and blade rolling plus tillage maintained crop yield at one and both years, respectively, compared to tillage. Without sufficient mulch for weed suppression, soil disturbance was required to control weeds and ensure adequate nitrogen uptake in the crop. Replacing one tillage operation with blade rolling reduces energy costs and erosion risk without sacrificing yield. At Lethbridge, previous herbicide and fertilizer use masked the effect of green manure management. Markedly different results from Carman and Lethbridge emphasize that the adaptability of reduced tillage green manure management is site-specific due to differences in climate and cropping history. This research highlights important differences in the efficacy, erosion risk, weed control, nitrogen availability, main crop yield and energy savings associated with each management method. en_US
dc.subject organic en_US
dc.subject reduced tillage en_US
dc.subject green manure en_US
dc.subject nitrogen en_US
dc.subject blade roller en_US
dc.subject weeds en_US
dc.title Reduced tillage implements for management of an organic green manure: effects on nitrogen, weeds and wheat yield en_US
dc.degree.discipline Plant Science en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Flaten, Don (Soil Science) Gulden, Rob (Plant Science) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Science (M.Sc.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2013 en_US


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