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dc.contributor.supervisor Singer, Murray (Psychology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Doering, Jeffrey Caley
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-10T20:10:35Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-10T20:10:35Z
dc.date.issued 2013-09-10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/22155
dc.description.abstract The activation of a predictive inference relies largely on the amount of contextual support for the inference in the text (Cook, Limber, & O’Brien, 2001). However, few sources of individual differences in predictive inference activation have been isolated. An experiment designed to identify possible sources of individual differences was conducted. One hundred and one participants completed an inference task using a long-passage correct rejection paradigm that included passages with varying levels of contextual support occurring mid-passage. Participants also completed a reading span measure (Daneman & Carpenter, 1980) and a knowledge access measure (Potts & Peterson, 1985). Results from ANOVA and regression analyses suggest that readers with better knowledge access abilities are better able to correctly reject inference concepts and are less affected by a change in inference-facilitating contextual support. It is suggested that higher knowledge access readers are able to construct and maintain a more specific representation of the text. en_US
dc.subject psychology en_US
dc.subject cognition en_US
dc.title Individual differences in text predictive inferences en_US
dc.degree.discipline Psychology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Jamieson, Randall (Psychology) Janzen, Terry (Linguistics) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2013 en_US


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