Show simple item record

dc.contributor.supervisor Jamieson, Randall (Psychology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Hauri, Brian R.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-08-16T16:47:02Z
dc.date.available 2013-08-16T16:47:02Z
dc.date.issued 2013-08-16
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/22031
dc.description.abstract People prefer symmetric over asymmetric patterns (Reber, Schwarz, & Winkielman, 2004). According to the fluency attribution perspective, this preference reflects differences in processing speed where increased processing efficiency leads to increased pattern preference. To test the account, in Experiment 1, participants’ speed of response to a pattern predicted the relationship between pattern symmetry and pattern preference. Experiment 2 expanded this account and found that a second measure of processing efficiency, recognition accuracy for patterns, predicted the relationship between pattern symmetry and pattern preference. Experiment 3 tested the attribution account of the fluency attribution hypothesis. Participants made a judgment of pattern mood rather than pattern preference. Despite a change of judgment task to an unintuitive judgment of pattern mood, participants attributed increased processing efficiency for patterns to increased pattern happiness. The three experiments provide an integration of the information processing and fluency attribution perspectives to account for symmetry preference judgments. en_US
dc.subject Symmetry en_US
dc.subject Fluency en_US
dc.subject Preference en_US
dc.subject Mediation Analysis en_US
dc.title A quantitative analysis of symmetry, fluency, and pattern preference en_US
dc.degree.discipline Psychology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Mondor, Todd (Psychology) Irani, Pourang (Computer Science) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2013 en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

View Statistics