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dc.contributor.supervisor Chipperfield, Judith (Psychology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Dubberley, Kathleen M. A.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-01-03T16:01:13Z
dc.date.available 2013-01-03T16:01:13Z
dc.date.issued 2013-01-03
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/14392
dc.description.abstract Perceived control (PC), the degree to which individuals believe they have direct influence over events in their life, is often found to be associated with emotional well-being. Moreover, for over three decades, research has demonstrated that PC fosters health in advanced age. The mediational role of health in the PC and emotion relationship was investigated. Community-dwelling older adults (n = 232) were examined via secondary data analysis from the Aging in Manitoba (AIM) project and the Successful Aging Study (SAS). Separate mediational models were assessed for two different health mediators, self-rated health and health-related restrictions, and for positive and negative emotions. PC was found to benefit both physical and emotional well-being. The evidence of mediation was most compelling in the prediction of negative emotions and health-related restrictions. Findings have implications for treatment interventions in hopes to foster PC which in turn, should promote health and enhance later life emotional well-being. en_US
dc.subject Perceived Control en_US
dc.subject Health en_US
dc.subject Emotions en_US
dc.subject Elderly en_US
dc.title Emotions in later life: the role of perceived control and subjective health en_US
dc.degree.discipline Psychology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Perry, Ray (Psychology) Lobchuk, Michelle (Nursing) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note February 2013 en_US


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