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Does perioperative nutrition improve clinical outcomes in patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery?: A network meta-analysis.

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dc.contributor.supervisor Dr. Sadeesh Srinathan (Department of Surgery) en_US
dc.contributor.author Burnside, Tyler
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-23T14:44:44Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-23T14:44:44Z
dc.date.issued 2012-11-23
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/11857
dc.description.abstract Each year in Canada, more than 2000 patients undergo surgical resection for treatment of esophageal, pancreatic or stomach cancer. However, resection of upper gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. One reason for the high rate of complications in this population of patients is preoperative malnutrition. To counteract the effects of malnutrition, post-operative nutritional support is often provided to these patients. Nutrition can be provided directly into the central circulation by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or into the GI tract via a nasojejunal tube (a catheter passed through the nose into the small bowel) or a surgically placed jejunostomy tube (through the anterior abdominal wall and into the small bowel). It remains unclear which method of nutrient delivery, if any, provides the best overall patient outcomes. For this reason, we have undertaken a network meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of the various perioperative nutritional delivery methods on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery. en_US
dc.subject Medicine en_US
dc.title Does perioperative nutrition improve clinical outcomes in patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery?: A network meta-analysis. en_US
dc.degree.discipline Medicine en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Medicine en_US
dc.degree.level Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2012 en_US


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