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dc.contributor.supervisor Labossiere, Paul (Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering) en_US
dc.contributor.author Biggs, Jessica
dc.contributor.author Borisov, Genadi
dc.contributor.author Halpin, Jared
dc.contributor.author Verwey, Cameron
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-17T15:48:28Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-17T15:48:28Z
dc.date.issued 2013-12-02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/35583
dc.description.abstract The ALPS (Aerial Lift Platform Specialists) were tasked with designing an aerial lift platform for the GLACIER facility in Thompson, Manitoba. This project consisted of three major phases: project definition, concept design, and final design. The first major project phase required identifying the problem statement and project objectives, and outlining the target specifications. We identified the constraints and limitations associated with designing an aerial lift platform (ALP) for use at the GLACIER facility, and outlined a project schedule. The second project phase was concept focused, and involved a great deal of research. We investigated all aspects of the required design, and identified current market solutions for the specific areas of design associated with our concepts, such as platform design, lifting mechanisms, and steering geometries. Employing the use of concept screening and scoring matrices, our team filtered a preliminary list of 62 concepts, spanning the eight functional categories of design, down to 23 suitable designs. Moving into the final project phase, we began final concept design, focusing on each of the eight functional design categories individually, and combining these optimized groups into one coherent final design. The GLACIER facility is in need of an ALP capable of meeting their size requirements. In order to meet facility requirements, a suitable lift must have a working surface area large enough to allow for access to all components of the engine while performing maintenance, troubleshooting, and sensor connection. The approximate size required for such a lift is 20’x20’. These restrictions result in increased costs associated with engine testing, longer turn-­?time, and reduced efficiency. The aerial lift platform we developed resembles that of a traditional scissor lift platform. Four wheels situated at the corners of the base platform consist of 28-­16-­22 MH20 solid rubber tires mounted on custom 22” diameter steel rims, with one set of wheels pivoting freely to give provision for steering of the platform. Wheels spindles re mounted high to allow for larger diameter wheels, while the base frame is built low to the ground in order to minimize the retracted height of the platform. Four sets of scissors are mounted […] en_US
dc.description.sponsorship MDS AeroTest en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.title Aerial Lift Platform Design for Engine Testing Service en_US
dc.type Report en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/report
dc.degree.discipline Mechanical Engineering en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Atamanchuk, Kathryn (Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering) en_US
dc.degree.level Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) en_US


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