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dc.contributor.supervisor Dr. Jeff Leiter, Dr. Peter MacDonald (Department of Orthopedic Surgery) en_US
dc.contributor.author Macek, Bryce
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-23T16:16:19Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-23T16:16:19Z
dc.date.issued 2012-11-23
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/11976
dc.description.abstract Rotator cuff tears are a common problem associated with muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration. These changes may be progressive and even irreversible despite successful repair. A deeper understanding of the cellular processes contributing to these degenerative changes is needed to predict outcomes. The objectives of the present study are to: 1) characterize rotator cuff tears through clinical exam and MRI, 2) compare muscle atrophy at the cellular level via muscle biopsy of torn supraspinatus and deltoid, 3) determine if cuff tear size is related to clinical variables. Ten patients with clinical and MRI evidence of a rotator cuff tear were biopsied from supraspinatus and deltoid muscles during arthroscopy. Samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to determine fiber diameter. Fiber diameter of the deltoid muscle was greater than the supraspinatus (p<.OOl). Distribution of fiber diameter of the supraspinatus and deltoid muscles did not follow a normal distribution, which may indicate muscle atrophy. The deltoid muscle of seven patients did follow a normal distribution compared to three supraspinatus muscles. The results of this study suggest that the deltoid muscle is a viable option to use as a control in microscopic studies of rotator cuff muscles. When combined with the other phases of this research project the results of this study have the potential to provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration in shoulder injury. This information can be used to guide new treatments and increase the effectiveness of current interventions. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Medicine en_US
dc.title Exploring the biologics of rotator cuff injury and advancing repair en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/bachelorThesis
dc.degree.discipline Medicine en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Medicine en_US
dc.degree.level Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2012 en_US


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